Why You Should Plant A Vegetable Garden

Vegetable gardening has almost dissolved in many areas of the world. However, there is no reason to believe that planting a vegetable garden has to be a thing of days gone by …

Plant A Vegetable Garden

If you’re an adult over 30 then it is likely you remember when vegetable gardening was very much a necessity in some homes. It’s likely you had a grandparent or even a great-grandparents who you remember fondly for their gardening techniques and attention to detail in gardening.

Vegetable gardening has almost dissolved in many areas of the world. However, there is no reason to believe that planting a vegetable garden has to be a thing of days gone by. You can learn to plant a thriving garden and you can do it without too much effort in the learning process.

Vegetable gardening is as rewarding for many people as flower gardening. You can take the opportunity to plant a vegetable garden and use the time you spend outside to clear your head and think about the great things in your life you have to be thankful for or, in the case of vegetable gardening, think about the delicious foods which you are going to be producing in your garden!

The first thing you want to do when you decide to plant a vegetable garden is to decide which vegetables you want in your garden. You may want a complete garden full of green beans, cucumbers, tomatoes and corn or you may want to keep your vegetable garden simple with tomatoes and onions. Think about what you would want to serve fresh on your table and start there. You can always add more to your garden later when you have the time and the desire.

Once you choose what you want to plant, make sure you have all of the seeds you need and all of the tools you need to start. Then, get out the garden tools and start digging up a refreshing garden of vegetables!

What is In This Season?

If you have spent time really reading the menu when you go to a restaurant, then you will be familiar with the words “Seasonal Vegetables”. It is a phrase that is often used, and for many people, more than anything it conjures up images of whatever veg they have on the plate with their Christmas roast. It’s strange but true – people do not stop and think about meanings like you might think they do. Of course seasonal vegetables are actually whatever happens to be thriving in the gardens and allotments at the time. Depending on what time of the year it is, this can vary quite a bit. Some vegetables, like cauliflower and broccoli, thrive all year round, although they are particularly good in more temperate climates.

Brussel Sprouts do particularly well in the first three months of the year, for example. Although unpopular with almost every child in the world, they are an excellent source of vitamins and minerals. And in some countries they are part of the traditional Christmas dinner. This is more the case in colder climates, when temperatures get lower earlier. Some veg, however, thrives a lot better in the summer months. If you want to grow peppers, the best time is from July onwards. For green peppers, starts in July, and for chili peppers it is fine to start a month later.

With the correct information to hand – and it is easy to find it on the Internet – you will find that along with the all-year-round standby veg you can grow, there are seasonal vegetables that reach their peak time in each season – meaning that you can have an excellent variety of fruit and veg all year around, eating it when it is at its finest and getting a balanced, varied diet packed with the nutrients you need for energy, vitality and happiness. It really is worth the effort, and you will get a real sense of achievement from dishing up – and eating – a meal that you have grown and cooked yourself.

How To Deal With Problems And Pests In Vegetable Gardening

There are many diseases, insects and other critters that may become a problem in your vegetable garden, but there are just as many ways that you can effectively deal with these sorts of problems …

Vegetable gardening is not a great way of saving money because you will be producing your own vegetables to feed yourself and your family, but also a great way of getting outdoors and staying active. There are many diseases, insects and other critters that may become a problem in your vegetable garden, but there are just as many ways that you can effectively deal with these sorts of problems.

Remedies

For each different problem there is a different solution and when it comes to fungus diseases with your vegetable gardening, baking soda makes for a great remedy. It is inexpensive and very effective, and weekly spraying of a baking soda mixture onto your plants can greatly reduce the incidence of powdery mildew in your garden.

This mixture is very easy to make, and all you need is 1 tablespoon baking soda, ½ teaspoon liquid soap, and 1 gallon of water. Mix this all together and use as a fungicide on your plants.

If your problem is more with bugs, then worm compost is going to be your best friend here. You can simply sprinkle some of this compost over the regular soil once or twice a week and your problem should be solved.

Products

Besides home remedies there are also many products that you can purchase to help deal with pests and problems with your vegetable gardening. Shake Away Small Critter Powder for instance, which is a refined form of fox urine that comes as a powder, and once single 20-ounce container holds enough to create a protective strip one foot wide and 600 feet long around the perimeter of your vegetable garden.

Get Away is another great product, one that is a versatile raccoon and squirrel pest repellant and which works both by odor and taste, which means that it is great at discouraging raccoons and opossum attacks on garbage and will also keep them away from nibbling on the plants in your vegetable garden.

By using the proper treatments to take care of your vegetable garden you will end up producing gorgeous, healthy vegetables.

Grow Better Vegetables With Raised Bed Vegetable Gardening Methods

Because the soil is cultivated deeper, raised bed vegetable gardening provides an ideal environment for root crops such as carrots and beets and with the looser soil crop yields tend to be greater …

The raised bed garden is so much easier to maintain. The higher bed means less stooping and bending when weeding or caring for plants and you never have to step in the beds which prevent the soil from compacting. Because the soil is cultivated deeper, raised bed vegetable gardening provides an ideal environment for root crops such as carrots and beets and with the looser soil crop yields tend to be greater. Plus the raised beds simply look neater.

Raised Bed Vegetable Gardening – Economical Construction

Raised beds are not necessarily expensive to build because the frames can be built from rough cut or even used lumber. The boards can be painted or stained with a non toxic preservative.

The sides of your raised bed vegetable garden should be at least six inches deep and approximately four to six feet wide, or just wide enough for you to reach the center from either side without having to step into the bed. The walls of the bed will need to be anchored to keep them from falling over and this is best done by driving stakes at four to six feet intervals on the outside of the frame.

Once the frame is constructed it is ready to be filled with soil, but not just any soil. The beds should contain a mixture of sand, soil and organic compost material. Using just regular garden soil will cause the beds to pack down and make drainage difficult. Your plants will thrive in the looser soil and it makes an ideal environment for earthworms as well.

Raised Bed Vegetable Gardening – A Frameless Option

If you don’t have the option of raised beds, because of a limited budget or lack of materials you can still try your hand at raised bed vegetable gardening following a method the Chinese have used for centuries. It’s really more of a mound than a raised bed but will give you many of the same benefits. Mix equal amounts of sand and compost into the soil to build up mounded beds. These frameless beds may need a little more attention to prevent them from eroding or becoming too dry.

Whichever method you choose, raised vegetable gardening will make the chores involved much easier. Raised beds are a great way for those with limited mobility to continue to enjoy a favourite hobby. Your garden can grow as your needs grow, simply by adding new beds and the beds look attractive all year long because clean up in the garden is minimal.